Wholefood Cuisine

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Eating Outside the Industrial Box

Perfectly Ripe Raspberries

Perfectly ripe raspberries in my garden.


 
On Friday, Larry and I were in the garden and noticed that the raspberries on our raspberry canes were starting to turn red.
Larry lifted up one of the canes, which were bending over under the weight of the berries and one of the raspberries fell off into his hand. He gave it to me to eat.

It was amazing!

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Garlic Dill Brine Pickles

 

I’ve had my attention on making these pickles this week and was wondering when pickling cucumbers would appear. And, lo-and-behold, found the first pickling cucumbers at one of my local farmer’s market. And fresh dill! And new crop garlic. So these are completely a homemade product of the farmer’s market.

These pickles are very simple to make, and very fresh because they are completely raw. Most pickles nowadays are made with hot vinegar poured over the vegetables—which cooks them—but brine pickles are made the old slow way with fermentation breaking down and preserving the vegetables.

Fermented brine pickles are also supercharged with enzymes that aid digestion. They contain the natural full spectrum probiotics of the place where you live and make your pickles.

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Going Beyond Trying To Make Industrial Foods Out of So-Called “Good” Ingredients

I just received a recipe in my email that I had to tell you about because it’s such a beautiful example of what I’m NOT doing on this blog.

I’m on a lot of mailing lists for food blogs just to see what’s going on in the world of food—particularly if they claim to be healthy—and also to get ideas for flavor combinations I can use in my wholefood cuisine.

This recipe is from Meghan Telpner. I’m not trying to pick on Meghan. She’s a blogger who has made more than a million dollars selling her concept of natural, nutritious foods. I’m just using this as an example because it’s the recipe that prompted me to write this post. But many other so-called “healthy” bloggers are doing the same thing. And so is the natural food industry.

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Why We Need to Eat Whole Food That is Really Whole


 
I just received a recipe in my email that I had to tell you about because it’s such a beautiful example of what I’m NOT doing on this blog.

I’m on a lot of mailing lists for food blogs just to see what’s going on in the world of food—particularly if they claim to be healthy—and also to get ideas for flavor combinations I can use in my wholefood cuisine.

This recipe is from Meghan Telpner. I’m not trying to pick on Meghan. She’s a blogger who has made more than a million dollars selling her concept of natural, nutritious foods. I’m just using this as an example because it’s the recipe that prompted me to write this post. But many other so-called “healthy” bloggers are doing the same thing. And so is the natural food industry.

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Eating At the Table

I’ve been taking an online masterclass with Alice Waters at Masterclass.com, and the last lesson was “Coming Back to the Table.”

It’s all about eating around a table with family or friends—slowly—having time to savor the food and each other. Deep conversation. Getting to know each other.

I cried because I want this and don’t have much of it.

I was born in 1955 where the icon of “dinner was a family sitting around the television, each one with their own separate foldable “tv table” with a “tv dinner” on it (if you’ve never had one it’s a frozen dinner that comes in an aluminum tray with sections that have a meat, a vegetable, mashed potatoes, and sometimes a dessert or condiment like cranberry sauce).

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Alice Waters, Chez Panisse, and the Delicious Revolution

I want to introduce you to Alice Waters because she has had the greatest influence on my culinary viewpoint and still influences me anew today. I will be sharing with you many things I have learned from Alice through her books and eating at Chez Panisse, and from experiencing the food of others in the San Francisco Bay Area who have also been influenced by her. I would say that more than anyone else of our time, the food we eat today and the food available to us today has been shaped by Alice Waters.

In 1971, Alice, age 27, opened her restaurant Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California. She had no culinary training or restaurant experience. Like me, Alice grew up on industrial food products of the time, like Wonder Bread and Wishbone salad dressing. And then as a young woman, she went to France, and her life (and mine) changed forever.

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Welcome to
Wholefood Cuisine!

This blog is about eating “whole food” that is really whole and about creating a style of wholefood cuisine that comes from the inherent flavors and qualities of the foods themselves, rather than trying to make familiar industrial-style foods from whole ingredients.

To eat in this manner is not only enjoyable, it also benefits health and the environment.

Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, our industrial food supply is crumbling fast. And we still need to eat. I’ll show you how.

Debra